Account Navigation

Account Navigation

Currency - All prices are in AUD

Currency - All prices are in AUD
 Loading... Please wait...
Quality Collectible Coins

Blog

Finding Mint Marks on US Coins

Posted by Tom Deaux on

What is a mint mark?

A mint mark is an abbreviation that denotes the minting facility that a coin was manufactured in. There have been 8 mints in the United States since the first national mint opened in Philadelphia in 1793. These mints and the abbreviation used as their mint mark are shown below:

Mint Mint Mark
Philadelphia, PA P (or none)
Denver, CO D
San Francisco, CA S (or none)
West Point W (or none)
New Orleans, LA O
Carson City, NV CC
Charlotte, NC C
Dahlonega, GA D

These mint marks are located in a specific area of the coin depending on the kind of coin (e.g. the mint mark on a Lincoln Cent is under the date). The mint mark can be on either the front (obverse) or the back (reverse).

Not all coins have mint marks. For example, most coins minted in Philadelphia don’t have mint marks, with some exceptions. Most coins that were not minted in Philadelphia have mint marks.

There is a paragraph below for each denomination of US Coin. Each paragraph provides an example for each kind of coin in that denomination showing where the mint mark would be located if there is one. ). If you know where to look you can determine (most of the time) where a coin was manufactured. This post shows you where to look.

Half Cents

All half cents were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Large Cents

Manufactured in Philadelphia, they do not have a mint mark.

Flying Eagle Cents

Manufactured in Philadelphia, they do not have a mint mark.

Indian Head Cents

Manufactured in Philadelphia, they do not have a mint mark.

Lincoln Cents

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the obverse under the date:

       

Two Cent Pieces

All two cent pieces were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Three Cent Pieces

All three cent pieces were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Shield Nickels

All shield nickels were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Liberty Head Nickels

In 1912 liberty head nickels were manufactured in Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco. All other liberty head nickels were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark. Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse at about 7 o’clock:

       

Buffalo Nickels

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse at 6 o’clock:

        

Jefferson Nickels

(1938 to 1942)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse at 3 o’clock

The 1942 coin was issued in two styles (see next paragraph below).

        

(1942 to 1945)

The 1942 coin was issued in two styles (see previous paragraph above). 1943 to 1945 are all as shown below.

The (large) manufacturers’ mint mark is below “E PLURIBUS UNUM” on the reverse. This is one of the instances where the Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark.

        

(1946 to 1967)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse at 3 o’clock:

        

(1968 to 1979)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark located at 5 o’clock on the obverse.

        

(1980 to 2004)

This is another instance where the Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark. The D, P, or S is located at 5 o’clock on the obverse:

        

(2005)

Yet another instance where the Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark. The D, P, or S is located under the Liberty/Date on the obverse:

        

(2006 to Present)

The Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark. The D, P, or S is located under the date on the obverse:

        

Half Dimes (1792 to 1873)

All half dimes were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Early Dimes from 1796 to 1837

All early dimes were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Seated Liberty Dimes (1837 to 1891)

(1837 to 1859)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in New Orleans, San Francisco, or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse above the bow and below “ONE DIME”:

        

(1860 to 1891, except 1875)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in New Orleans, San Francisco, or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse at 6 o’clock under the bow.

        

(1875)

Two varieties of Liberty Dimes were minted in 1875.

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Carson City or San Francisco have the mint mark either above the bow or below the bow (photos above).

Barber Dimes (1862 to 1916)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver, New Orleans, or San Francisco, have a mint mark on the reverse at 6 o’clock under the bow.

        

Mercury Dimes (1916 to 1945)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco, have a mint mark on the reverse at 7 o’clock near the rim.

        

Roosevelt Dimes (1946 to Present)

(1946 to 1967)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse to the left of the bottom of the torch.

        

(1968 to 1979)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver, San Francisco, or West Point have a mint mark located on the obverse above the date.

        

(1980 to Present)

The Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark.

All Roosevelt dimes from this period have a mint mark located on the obverse above the date.

        

Twenty Cent Pieces (1875 to 1878)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in San Francisco or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse at 6 o’clock, above the “Y” in “TWENTY”:

        

Early Quarters (1796 to 1838)

All early quarters were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Seated Liberty Quarters (1838 to 1891)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in New Orleans, San Francisco, or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse below the eagle.

        

Barber Quarters (1892 to 1916)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver, New Orleans, or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse below the eagle’s tail.

        

Standing Liberty Quarters (1916 to 1930)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the obverse at 7 o’clock to the right of the lowest star.

        

Washington Quarters (1932 to 1998)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse at 6 o’clock above the ‘R’ in ‘QUARTER’.

        

State, Territorial, and America The Beautiful Quarters (1999 to Present)

The Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark.

All Quarters from this period have a mint mark located on the obverse below ‘IN GOD WE TRUST’.

        

Early Half Dollars (1794 to 1839)

All early Half Dollars were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Capped Bust Half Dollars (1807 to 1839)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in New Orleans have a mint mark on the obverse at about 6 o’clock above the date.

        

Seated Liberty Half Dollars (1839 to 1891)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in New Orleans, San Francisco, or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse below the eagle.

        

Barber Half Dollars (1892 to 1915)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver, New Orleans, or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse below the eagle’s tail.

        

Walking Liberty Half Dollars (1916 to 1947)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse about 7 o’clock near the rim.

        

Franklin Half Dollars (1948 to 1963)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse 12 o’clock under the ‘E’ in ‘STATES’.

        

Kennedy Half Dollars (1964 to 1967)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver have a mint mark on the reverse at about 7 o’clock under the eagle’s right claw.

        

Kennedy Half Dollars (1968 to 1979)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver have a mint mark on the obverse at about 6 o’clock under Kennedy’s bust.

        

Kennedy Half Dollars (1980 to Present)

The Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark.

All Half Dollars from this period have a mint mark on the obverse at about 6 o’clock under Kennedy’s bust.

        

Early Dollars (1794 to 1839)

All early Dollars were manufactured in Philadelphia and they do not have a mint mark.

Seated Liberty Dollars (1840 to 1873)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in New Orleans, San Francisco, or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse below the eagle.

        

Trade Dollars (1873 to 1885)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in San Francisco or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse below the eagle.

        

Morgan Dollars (1878 to 1921)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in New Orleans, Denver, San Francisco or Carson City have a mint mark on the reverse below the eagle.

        

Peace Dollars (1921 to 1935)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the reverse at about 7:30 o’clock above the eagle’s tail feathers.

        

Eisenhower Dollars (1971 to 1978)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the obverse at about 5 o’clock under the bust.

        

Susan B Anthony Dollars (1979 to 1999)

Those manufactured in Philadelphia do not have a mint mark.

Those manufactured in Denver or San Francisco have a mint mark on the obverse at about 8 o’clock above the shoulder of the bust.

        

Sacagawea and Presidential Dollars (2000 to Present)

The Philadelphia mint issue includes a mint mark.

All Dollars from this period have a mint mark on the edge of the coin.

        

That’s all of the mint mark locations for most common US Coins. If there is enough interest in documenting mint mark locations for US gold coins, commemorative coins, or other less common coins we’ll expand this blog post.

View Comments


How to Protect and Organize Collectible Coins for Beginners

Protect and Organize Coins Coin collectors new to the hobby soon realize that coins need to be protected, both from mishandling and from the environment so that they will not deteriorate in quality and value. They also learn that they need to organize their coins in order to be able to find specific ones. Storage of the coins is related [...]

Read More »

QCC Proxy Coin now available in most denominations

The Quality Collectible Coins Proxy coin is now available in the following size diameters:18 mm for US Dimes and some small gold pieces.19 mm for US Small Cents, including Flying Eagle, Indian, and Lincoln.24 mm for US Quarters and1795-1829 $5 Gold pieces.29 mm for US Large Cents and Half Dollars.38.1 mm for US Seated, Morgan, Peace, and Eisenhower [...]

Read More »

Basics of American Silver Eagles

The American Silver Eagle came into existence in 1986 with the issuance of three types of coins. All American Silver Eagles contain one Troy ounce of 99.9% fine silver and have the same design features on the obverse and the reverse, but each type is manufactured differently and for different purposes.The three types of American Silver EaglesType 1Bullion (aka Uncirculated) [...]

Read More »

The 1964 Kennedy half dollar, "Accented Hair" variety

In 1964 the first Kennedy half dollars were produced. The design used for the first few weeks is now called the "Accented Hair" variety. The second design followed without the "Accented Hair".The coins used for commerce (Business Strike) coins were produced in abundant quantity so most of them don't have much if any numismatic value. [...]

Read More »

How To Tell the Difference Between the 1970-S Lincoln Cent Large Date and Small Date Varieties.

The 1970-S Lincoln Cent was produced in two varieties; the common Large Date and the scarce Small Date. Both varieties were produced in both Mint State and ProofsHere is an example of a common 1970-S Lincoln Cent Large Date variety. The purple arrow shows that the loop of the 9 points toward the mint mark. The green lines show [...]

Read More »

The 1943 Lincoln Cent

The 1943 Lincoln CentMany customers have heard rumors about a steel Lincoln cent, particularly that there are some valuable ones. Here is some information regarding this interesting coin.HistoryIn 1942 the United States was engaged in World War II. We had sufficient amounts of steel but were short on copper so the decision was made to produce the Lincoln Cents [...]

Read More »

Should I buy new US Mint Uncirculated Mint Sets and Proof Sets?

What are Uncirculated Mint Sets and Proof Sets?The US Mint web site describes their 2017 Uncirculated Coin set (Mint Set) as follows:"The 2017 United States Mint Uncirculated Coin Set® contains two folders of 10 coins each, one from the United States Mint at Philadelphia and the other from the United States Mint at Denver, for [...]

Read More »

How much is this coin worth?

When I am asked this question by a customer I have some standard short responses depending on whether he has the coin with him, and on how much experience I perceive him to have with coins. The real answer to that question is not that simple, and is the topic of this article. This article is limited in scope [...]

Read More »